An eerie sight

David introduces a new feature at Librarything:

“tagmashes,” which are (in essence) searches on two or more tags. So, you could ask to see all the books tagged “france” and “wwii.” But the fact that you’re asking for that particular conjunction of tags indicates that those tags go together, at least in your mind and at least at this moment. Library turns that tagmash into a page with a persistent URL.

I like everything about this, apart from the horrible name. As somebody points out in comments, it’s not a new idea – a large part of David’s post could have been summed up in the words “Librarything have implemented faceted tagging“. But I think this is still something worth shouting about, for two reasons. Firstly, they have implemented it – it’s there now to be played with, even if it’s got a silly name. Secondly and more importantly, they’ve implemented ground-up faceted tagging: the facets are created by the act of searching for particular combinations of tags. At a stroke this addresses the disadvantages I identified in my post; rather than being imposed beforehand, the dimensions into which the tags are organised emerge from the ways people want to combine tags. Arguably, what Librarything have ended up with is something like a cross between faceted tagging and Flickr-style tag clusters (in which dimensions emerge from an aggregate of past searches).

What’s more, the ability to record an association between two tags addresses a question I raised way back here. If, to quote Tom Evslin, “we think in terms of associations” (rather than conceptual hierarchies); and if “the relationship between documents is actually dynamic … open tagging and hyperlinking are both ways to impose particular relationships on documents to meet the need of some subset of readers”; then it’s curious, to say the least, that it’s been so hard until now to use tagging to say this is like that (as distinct from this has frequently been applied to resources which have also been classified as that). From del.icio.us on, tagging has been a simple naming operation, hitching up things to names (stuff-for-classifying to tags), but not allowing any connection between those names. The implication is that the higher-order knowledge of what went with what would only emerge – could only emerge – from the aggregate of everyone else’s naming acts.

The ‘tagmash’ reminds us that (pace David) everything is not miscellaneous: yes, we think in associations and we apply our own labels and classifying schemes to the world, but as we do so we’re also connecting A to B and treating D as a sub-type of C. When we talk, we don’t just spray names around; we’re always adding a bit of structure to the conversational cloud, making a few more connections. It’s the connections, not the nodes, that map out the shape of a cloud of knowing.

Update Changed post title. I spent a good five minutes this afternoon thinking of an appropriate lyrical reference (eventually settling on this one); I don’t know how I missed the obvious choice.

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